Category Archives: Deep-Sky Imaging

First Light image for the mini-WASP array at the New Forest Observatory

This image shows the Sadr region of Cygnus (the Gamma Cygni nebulosity).  This is a 2,000 second sub-exposure taken using one M26C camera (the other is on its way back to Starlight Xpress today for repair).  No proper drift alignment done yet, so there is a lot of Polar rotation in the image, not to mention hot pixels and dust bunnies – but it is FIRST LIGHT for one of the biggest personal projects I’ve ever undertaken – so a real milestone for me personally 🙂

 

Pulsar Observatories dome for the mini-WASP parallel imaging array

Gary & Dave of Pulsar Observatories Ltd. delivered and fitted the fibreglass dome for the new mini-WASP imaging array soon to be operational at the New Forest Observatory. The mini-WASP array details can be followed on the New Forest Observatory web site – but in a nutshell – the mini-WASP borrows the idea of using multiple imaging scopes and cameras from the SUPERWASP project – basically to get the most data downloaded in the shortest possible time.  When fully kitted out and operational this will be the most powerful amateur deep-sky imaging facility on the planet 🙂

Parker/Carboni do a wide-field of the Whale & Hockey Stick (galaxies) region of Coma Berenices

Recently processed by Noel Carboni this data was acquired just a few days ago at the New Forest Observatory.  This image shows the Whale & Hockey Stick galaxies in Coma Berenices, and to the lower/far left there are a pair of tiny interacting galaxies called “The Mice”.  What would be an unbalanced frame gains balance between the bunch of bright stars at the bottom and the small galaxies at the top.  Unfortunately it is not always possible to play this trick 🙂

 

M53 and NGC5053 in Coma Berenices

We had an unexpectedly clear night last night and I managed to get a full 3 and a half hours total imaging time on the M53 region with the Sky 90/M25C.  There’s a bonus of another globular cluster at the top of the image.  200-second sub-exposures, and 63 of them in total produced this deep-sky image of the area.  I did the processing on the version shown here – Noel will do a much better job on the data when he gets round to looking at it 🙂